The Stain-proof Undershirt

We've made unbelievable innovations in the last 40 years. NASA has sent a probe rocketing pass the boundaries of our solar system. Scientists have begun 3D printing replacement body parts. But, if you drop bar-be-cue sauce on your shirt at lunch –  well, you're still out of luck.

The plain white T-shirt is a staple in every man’s wardrobe, but with each wear you’re forced to vigilantly avoid all manner of sauces, spills and other airborne liquid projectiles or risk rendering it instantly unwearable. If clothing company Threadsmiths has anything to say about it however, that worry will soon become a thing of the past.

‘The Cavalier’ is a 100 percent cotton T-shirt that utilizes patented hydrophobic nanotechnology, which just as it sounds, actually repels dirt and liquid. It’s machine washable, and only requires the bare minimum of extra care when cleaning to retain its liquid-busting properties.

At $55 apiece, the Cavalier is definitely not cheap - you could buy 22 regular Hanes t-shirts - but a world where all clothing is made using this tech would be a game changer. We’ve all consigned our share of ruined white T-shirts to the rag pile, but imagine suits, ties, pants, your favorite designer sneakers, or even children's clothing coming standard equipped with the same stain armor technology.

As long as there is gravity, there will be spills. While the Cavalier is just a small, pricey step, what it represents is a giant leap in apparel innovation.

If you're an early adopter, you can snag a 15 percent discount using the code PREORDER.

Chris Nesi is a writer and editor born and raised in New Jersey but currently living in Orlando, Florida. His work has appeared in more than a dozen publications including TechCrunch, The Huffington Post and Consulting magazine. When he isn't writing he enjoys swimming, reading, and cycling.

  • Deke

    L.L. Bean’s standard t-shirts tend to be water resistant even though I don’t believe they specifically advertise them as such (small spills bead up and roll off the shirt). There is a draw back that I’ve found: the inside is somewhat water resistant as well (hello sweat). Maybe these folks have figured that part out, but I’d say proceed with caution if you have any plans on wearing these in a hot climate.

  • John Waldowski

    I really want one of these shirts but I have to wonder, how do you wash them?

    • http://www.primermagazine.com/ Andrew

      The instructions say to machine wash cold with like colors and tumble dry.

      • John Waldowski

        Right but if water just rolls off them it seems like it would be challenging to wash them.

  • http://Batmannananana.com/ Caesar Merlin

    55 bucks is a bit steep. I’d rather buy several packs of cotton undershirts for that price

  • Trey

    How about throwing down $20 on a box of Rustoleum Never-Wet and applying on a new T-shirt and giving that ago? Not exactly sure how was able the combo would be, but then again… You could just waste $55 on a single shirt.

    • http://www.primermagazine.com/ Andrew

      That would definitely be a fun experiment!

      • Trey

        I’ll give it a shot when I apply it to my new Converse. I’ll try to remember to update this after I do!