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100 Days of Fitness: Week 7 – Footwear

How long does it take to change your life? Follow author Robert Fure as he begins a 100 day trek to a fitter, healthier life by following this simple program. Today, we talk about footwear on the 100 Days of Fitness program.

 

Footwear? Really? Yes. Really. It’s pretty important. Vital, in fact, if you work outside or go running a lot. If you work out at home, then footwear isn’t that big of a deal. In fact, you might not even need them at all. Sound strange?

Plenty of people work out barefoot – actor Tom Jane for one and some guy named Arnold Schwarzenegger. Now, big Arnold used to work out barefoot in the gym, which I wouldn’t recommend to my worst enemy (okay, to my worst enemy I would). Gyms are dangerous – full of lots of people dropping lots of heavy things. Even worse, the amount of dirt, grime, and bacteria swimming around the floor. You don’t want any of that on your feet.

But at home – hey. I actually work out barefoot. There are some benefits. First, you don’t dirty any of your socks. Yeah, I’m joking. Sort of. But really, training barefoot helps work on your stability and balance.Some people maintain that wearing a shoe changes the way that your leg muscles work in walking and running, so going the natural route can get you back in tune with nature. But really, I don’t like going through two pairs of socks a day and I do feel increased performance in my balance and stability.

That said, I think people who run barefoot are idiots. I think people who would go barefoot to the gym are dumb. I think those five-finger shoe glove things stink, look terrible, and probably aren’t that great for your foot. Running outside, or on the treadmill, involves a lot of hard impact on hard surfaces in areas that may be littered with sharp debris. Someone may try to tell you that cavemen went barefoot, but I would reckon cavemen never ran on concrete, nor did they just go for a two hour run in the morning to feel good. Wear shoes.

When selecting the proper footwear, you want to look for the following:

  • Fit
  • Comfort
  • Durability

Fit is most important - if you have a shoe that doesn’t fit correctly, you’re more prone to injury, both serious ones like twisted ankles and pulled muscles, and relatively minor ones, like blisters and ankle scrapes. After that is comfort, which is a no-brainer – if you’re going to be working hard in a pair of shoes, you want a comfortable set. When I see people working out in dress shoes or boots, that’s a no-no for me. Shoes like that weren’t meant for hard, repeated impacts and running. You should get a shoe designed for the athletic activity you’re going to be doing.

Last, but not least, is durability. I’m notoriously rough on shoes and can burn through them pretty quickly. That’s just an annoying waste of money. I’m willing to spend a few extra bucks to get a quality pair of sneakers – though don’t let price fool you. Just because it’s expensive, doesn’t mean that it’s not going to break apart after a month.

Personally, I wear the Reebok Zigtech shoes. These are, without a doubt, the most scientifically advanced pair of shoes I’ve ever owned. They’re also aggressive looking, which is a plus for me these days. The sole of the shoe has radically been redesigned in this zig-zag fashion, which serves a few functions. The soft-heel of the shoe seems to absorb more impact, which sends less of a shock into your body. This design also gives the shoe better flexibility, allowing it to bend and flex with your foot with every step, which is beneficial while running or doing more extreme activities that require greater flexibility, like free running or climbing. Reebok states that the Zigs decrease wear and tear on your body by 20%, though I’ve got no way of testing that.

In fact, all that science blah-blah-blah doesn’t really matter to me. What matters is comfort and durability, and the Zigtechs are homeruns on both fronts so far. In terms of comfort, I’ve got a fat foot – I normally wear wide shoes when available, or order a half-size up. Even then, its hard to find shoes that fit great – its impossible for me to wear ADIDAS without buying like a size 14 because they’re so narrow. The ZigTechs, upon first laceup, felt a bit snug, but actually accommodated my feet well and and had good breathability to them. On the subject of durability, I’ve worn them around the house, to the gym, ran them up and down pavement, and jumped just about every which way in them and they’re still like new out of the box.

If you’re going to be running around the house working out (which I highly recommend) then shoes aren’t important. But once you step outside into that dangerous world of syringes and dirt, strap on a good pair of athletic shoes.

My Results

After a bad week last week, this weigh in gets us back on track with four pounds lost on the scale. Like I mentioned last week, I put some blame on the foods I ate late at night before last weeks weigh in. What probably happened was I lost a pound or two last week, but the couple of beers kept me a bit bloated. Then this week I probably hit a normal stride and lost two or three pounds. That would be a more reasonable guess of what’s going on rather than I lost no weight last week and then a whopping four pounds this week. So anyway, that brings my weight down to 238.5 pounds for a total of thirteen pounds gone. Works for me!

About

Robert Fure is a fitness, lifestyle, and entertainment writer living in Los Angeles. He is also a certified Personal Trainer and the Creator/Editor of Fit and Furious, an online outlet dedicated to the pursuit of a fit lifestyle. His entertainment work can be viewed at Film School Rejects.

 
  • Dan

    “Gyms are dangerous – full of lots of people dropping lots of heavy things. Even worse, the amount of dirt, grime, and bacteria swimming around the floor. You don’t want any of that on your feet.”

    If you think 5mm of soft material covering your toes/feet are going protect your feet from dropped weights etc then you are very much mistaken. A gym near me has thought this through and now allows bearfeet. Dirt and bacteria on your feet? My gosh! You feet are sealed and, unless you puncture your skin, this dirt is only a cosmetic problem. But guess what? Kids run bare footed everywhere, and I’d bet you also take your shoes off on beaches and in communal swimming pools. Compared to these gym floors pose no threat. As for bacteria, apart from not all bacteria being bad (infact some is good for you – growing up in a sterile bubble gives immune systems no chance to create proper immune responses to real-world threats), there is a huge breeding ground for these which you’ll encounter every day – socks and shoes. Incidence of Athlete’s Foot (I’ve seen) in barefooters: zero. In sock + shoe wearers: almost everyone has had it at some point. Sweating into socks for 2 hours is much worse than open air. Indeed, when you finish the first thing you do is….take those stinking socks off.

    “That said, I think people who run barefoot are idiots. I think people who would go barefoot to the gym are dumb. I think those five-finger shoe glove things stink, look terrible, and probably aren’t that great for your foot. Running outside, or on the treadmill, involves a lot of hard impact on hard surfaces in areas that may be littered with sharp debris. Someone may try to tell you that cavemen went barefoot, but I would reckon cavemen never ran on concrete, nor did they just go for a two hour run in the morning to feel good. Wear shoes.”

    VFF: Probably aren’t that great for feet, yet, they actually are. Hard surfaces have been around since the dawn of time. Literally. That’s why we have arches and pads on our forefeet, muscles, tendons and joints to reduce and indeed utilise this impact force. Cavemen live in, what, caves? They’d be made of granite (or other rock) which I’m sure is harder and rougher than most surfaces we have today. Two-hour runs to feel good? Maybe not. But two – or even 8 – hour runs to run-down and catch their food? Most certainly. The barefooted movement is less about actual bare skin to the ground per se, it’s about feedback, proper running form which cannot be felt shod, about limiting damage to joints through proper impact reduction through proper form. Having trained and run a little sans shoes I’ve noticed several things: I run injury free- from toenails to arches to thicker soles to stronger ankle joints and leg and knee muscles, zero back pain and generally increased flexibility. My feet are as healthy as ever – and the smoothest I see at gyms – ok my soles may be a little dirty but the skin is tough and smooth and intact. No blisters, no bruising, no Athlete’s foot, no cuts. I’ve become aware of my surroundings: to prevent cuts to my feet I simply look where I’m running. That said, I have run over glass from broken windows and – thanks to landing lightly, adapting, and instant feedback – I’ve barely noticed it. I run faster, not because I’ve much better form, am injury free from not slamming my heal into the ground, but because I’m more aware of the ground and my form. I’m more nimble in the gym, lighter, faster, more aware, and stronger. None of these are bad points, I’m sure you’ll agree.

    This isn’t a personal attack, merely a refute from someone who was sceptical, tried barefoot training properly, and has enjoyed the benefits for a year already. Sure, wear shoes trail hiking, walking around rough terrain, but don’t think they’ll protect you from a dropped dumbbell or keep your feet clean and healthy.

    I’d challenge you to follow a proper barefoot training/running program – building up, following your body’s feedback etc – for a month and then say your feet feel weaker, have been cut to shreds, and you’re suffering from some weird, flesh-eating microbe you’ve picked up from a gym floor.

  • David Blake

    “That said, I think people who run barefoot are idiots. I think people who would go barefoot to the gym are dumb. I think those five-finger shoe glove things stink, look terrible, and probably aren’t that great for your foot. Running outside, or on the treadmill, involves a lot of hard impact on hard surfaces in areas that may be littered with sharp debris. Someone may try to tell you that cavemen went barefoot, but I would reckon cavemen never ran on concrete, nor did they just go for a two hour run in the morning to feel good. Wear shoes.”

    Barefoot is not for everyone. It takes a lot of persistence and many months until your feet are adjusted. Like another replier said, to me, barefoot running is mostly about proper running form. 80% of runners have sharp heelstrikes when they run, and these sharp heelstriikes transmit more impact to the ankles, knees, hips, and backs than if you land on the mid or fore-foot. The spring ligament in the foot is supposed to flatten and rebound when you run, and this is impossible with too much arch support. Running shoes have a half inch elevation in the heel relative to the forefoot that prevents full range of motion of the calf. None of these things about running shoes are good, and there is no science to support their use. They feel good to people who are not runners, so everyone who gets introduced to the sport uses them.

    Unlike people who have not done it, I can safely say that barefoot running is not unsafe, that your feet can adapt so that there is no problem running at full speed on all kinds of paved surfaces.You will run with less impact if you adopt a running shoe that does not have a half inch extra elevation in the heel (relative to the front of the foot), that has a minimal arch support, and if you consistently land on your forefoot or midfoot. Feelmax has some shoes close to this, but Aqua Socks are not bad and they are much less expensive. As for me, all running shoes feel too uncomfortable for running, but I wash my feet after running and wear shoes the rest of the time.

    And wrt calling all people who run barefoot dumb, well, talk about an overgeneralization. You could start by educating yourself on the science that relates to barefoot running, or do it exclusively for about a year, and then have an informed opinion. The real problem with statements like yours is that they are made out of near complete ignorance and presented in professional forums.

  • http://www.primermagazine.com Robert Fure

    It sort of feels like you guys read half the article then jumped ship. If you made it to the conclusion, my basic point is that if the environment is suitable, feel free to train barefoot. Like I mentioned, I do train barefoot in my home. As a kid, I ran barefoot through the yard. I’m not a nanny.

    Agreed that a falling plate onto a foot, bare or not, is going to do damage and hurt, but there are plenty of dangers in the gym other than. Sharp edges, rough areas, metal objects strewn about the ground, and bacteria that can be absorbed through the foot. Athlete’s Foot isn’t caused by wearing socks – but it can be contracted by walking barefoot through a gym or locker room. Now, if you let your socks get sweaty and lay around for a few days, then put them back on, or let wet shoes hang around and then put them on, its possible the fungus could have grown there.

    If you guys can run safely barefoot, hey, it’s your choice. But the average person, or the person just getting into a fitness routine, probably shouldn’t and they probably wouldn’t want to take an entire month acclimating their feet to barefoot running.

    For me, in Los Angeles, you couldn’t pay me to run barefoot down the street, which is strewn with broken glass, loose pavement, dog poop, and all sorts of things that could easily piece my foot, but not my shoe.

    Thanks for reading and offering your comments, hopefully interested people will do their own research as this is a personal decision that shouldn’t be taken too lightly.

    Best,

    R.
    .-= Robert Fure´s last blog ..100 Days of Fitness: Week 7 – Footwear =-.

  • Bob

    “hopefully interested people will do their own research as this is a personal decision that shouldn’t be taken too lightly.”

    “That said, I think people who run barefoot are idiots. I think people who would go barefoot to the gym are dumb. I think those five-finger shoe glove things stink, look terrible, and probably aren’t that great for your foot.”

    They should do their own research exactly as you did. Hope you aren’t getting paid for this!

  • David Blake

    “If you guys can run safely barefoot, hey, it’s your choice. But the average person, or the person just getting into a fitness routine, probably shouldn’t and they probably wouldn’t want to take an entire month acclimating their feet to barefoot running.

    For me, in Los Angeles, you couldn’t pay me to run barefoot down the street, which is strewn with broken glass, loose pavement, dog poop, and all sorts of things that could easily pierce my foot, but not my shoe.”

    There are a number of common fallacies presented in your statements, and commonly presented when other people who have not run barefoot write about running barefoot. As a barefoot runner, I don’t really care if others run barefoot or not. But it should be presented fairly with regards to its benefits and costs or else you are simply slandering people who choose to run barefoot.

    If you think you could be adapted to barefoot running in a month, you are probably wrong. It took me four months to reach my prior speeds over 5 mile runs, and I can still tell the adaptations are progressing many months after that. It is a long, slow process if you have spent several decades with your feet in highly supported footwear.

    Second, with regards to Los Angeles, barefoot running there is no problem compared to anyplace else people run barefoot. You will just not choose routes where you stand a good chance of piercing your foot, and you will keep your eyes open, and it is all gonna work out just fine. Heck, running barefoot on the strand (near where I used to live) is easy compared to my current routes. A little broken glass is nothing compared to a long stretch of chip-seal pavement!

    Having gone through the process, I can guarantee you that very few people who try barefoot running are ever going to use it as their principle way of running. It takes too long to adapt, and there is too much pain along the way. People WANT to pull on a shoe and be able to run all day, and your feet just don’t work like that (whether you wear shoes or not!) But there are true benefits to attaining good running form, and going through the adaptation process makes attaining good running form second nature.

    -Dave

  • Travis

    What are you guys TALKING about? If ya’ll want to run barefoot, cool – whatever. Most people arent going to do it. This is for everyone else who wears shoes and how to find ones that accomplish their goals. Chill out.

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  • http://crossfitimpulse.com/ Jeff Barnett

    “That said, I think people who run barefoot are idiots. I think people who would go barefoot to the gym are dumb. I think those five-finger shoe glove things stink, look terrible, and probably aren’t that great for your foot.”

    Those are some very strong opinions that aren’t supported by facts. People who successfully condition their feet for barefoot running have developed immense connective tissue strength in their feet and undoubtedly have excellent running form, as poor running form is impossible to sustain barefoot. That’s not an idiot.

    Furthermore, working out barefoot is indeed beneficial for all the reasons you presented. So why is going to the gym barefoot dumb? I workout barefoot in my gym quite often. Like any other risk worth the reward, you just pay attention to what you are doing and ensure you don’t unnecessarily endander your feet. While I’m not the world’s fittest man, I think I’ve had some success in fitness. I don’t think I’m dumb.

    Vibram fives indeed look strange. Cars looked strange to people accustomed to horse-drawn carriages. If Vibrams aren’t that great for your foot then walking barefoot must not be either, because they are just a small step away from barefoot. If they “aren’t great for your feet” then the 2 million years of human evolution that developed our feet must have gotten it horribly wrong, because they are just one step away from a bare foot.

    Sorry for the opinionated rebuttal, but if you plan to call people “idiots” and “dumb,” especially as an admitted fitness novice, then you need to be prepared to substantiate your claims.
    .-= Jeff Barnett´s last blog ..Tuesday 8 June =-.

  • http://apartments.com.ua Apartments Kiev

    Thanks for the interestin article. As for me I prefer training barefoot but wear sneakers when walking or riding a bicycle. And those sneakers mentioned in the article.. Are they really comfortable?

  • http://www.primermagazine.com Robert Fure

    Perhaps my biggest flaw in this article was not realizing that Primer has a very dedicated barefoot running audience.

    I think if you’ll make it to the end of the article, the basic conclusion is – if you can work out safely without shoes, go for it. Its my opinion that the dangers of going barefoot in gyms and on pavement outweighs the benefit of running barefoot.

    Despite minor increases in efficiency, you can’t ignore all the obvious cons, from puncture injuries to infection. Podiatrists recommend you protect your feet.

    As for the Vibrams, them looking weird is obviously a personal opinion. I think they’re ugly. As for human evolution, there are thousands of things we do, or don’t do, that can have that same argument applied. Drinking milk, eating carbs, wearing clothes, sunglasses, living past 30. Shoes aren’t bad for your feet, so why fix what isn’t broken? Why take four months to adjust to running barefoot for negligible gains?

    There is also a middle ground – get a shoe like the Nike Air which is a fully protective shoe that has great flexibility. Or hey, maybe the Reebok ZigTech, which is also very flexible.

    And one last thing – I’m not an admitted fitness novice. Just because I’ve designed and am using a program available to everyone does not negate the last 7 years of working out, my 360lb bench, or all the research I’ve done in the last years.
    .-= Robert Fure´s last blog ..What is the Largest Great White Shark Ever Recorded? =-.

  • David Blake

    I am friends with two podiatrists that live near me. Both of them are very interested in barefoot running, and both listen to my experiences and check out my feet. Neither has made any kind of recommendation akin to what you suggest podiatrists recommend. In the last year of running 12-15 miles per week, I have not gotten any kind of infection in my foot, nor have I gotten puncture injuries. I am pretty sure if you ask barefoot runners, they will tell you the same. In fact, some podiatrists go as far as saying that the people with the fewest medical problems with their feet are those who spend the most time barefoot. But not all podiatrists agree, and I think the ones that are smarter and uninformed are skeptical and inquisitive like my friends (imagine that!)

    You really ought to stop making up things and presenting them as factually researched, and say something like “There are some benefits to barefoot running, like strengthened feet and reinforced good running form, but most people will find they do not want to endure the transition period of re-training their feet, which typically takes many months.” That’s what I usually tell people who ask me. Very few people have a reasonable appreciation for how long the transitionary period is.

  • http://www.primermagazine.com Andrew

    David, There’s nothing made up about it. From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

    But barefoot training remains controversial. Many podiatrists cringe at the notion of unshod feet pounding the pavement, where the risks include cuts, bruises and unsanitary conditions. “If we want to mimic barefoot running, shoes should come with broken glass and twigs,” says Stephen M. Pribut, a Washington, D.C., podiatrist and president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine. “The emphasis should be on getting the right shoe for your foot.”

    More:
    There isn’t a lot of scientific study on barefoot training. Research has shown that wearing shoes to exercise takes more energy, and that barefoot runners use about 4 percent less oxygen than shod runners. Other studies suggest barefoot athletes naturally compensate for the lack of cushioning and land more softly than runners in shoes, putting less shock and strain on the rest of the body. Barefoot runners also tend to land in the middle of their foot, which can improve running form and reduce injury.

    Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06157/696125-114.stm#ixzz0qOC3cQqT

    And an interview with podiatrist and foot and ankle surgeon Dr. Jeff Hurless:

    If somebody new to barefoot running starts doing it, they can get plantar fasciitis. I have a patient who was a tri-athlete and started barefoot running and came down with plantar fasciitis. You can also get a variety of tendinitises or soft tissue injuries. If you’re already a slightly over-pronator, you’re going to really over-pronate and you can get tibial tendinitis. If we lived without shoes, we’d probably have more success at barefoot running. The bone density might be better and muscles would be stronger. But we’re not always on our barefeet – it’s our society and culture to live in shoes and that’s the way it’s always going to be. We’re not in the best position to run barefoot.

    Read more here: http://www.healthyfeetblog.com/myths-about-barefoot-running

    All 3 of these clips represent what Robert states: Some people are into it, if you’re a solid runner and want to try and take it to the next level, by all means try barefoot running, just be careful. There’s no question though MOST people are going to be exercising with shoes on — and for them — we submit this article on making sure you find a shoe that accommodates your athletic goals.

    I think it’s great a lot of the commenters have had success with barefoot running, but the harsh tone suggests that it’s silly NOT to run barefoot, which hasn’t been presented either here or in academic research. The podiatrists I’ve quoted above see some benefit in it but they also caution there can be some negative side effects of it. If you’ve had nothing but good results, that’s fantastic, but doesn’t change the cautions of medical professionals.

  • David Blake

    Andrew, I am wondering if I am supposed to reply by cherrypicking podiatrist quotes that state the opposite? There is no solid medical evidence one way or the other on injury rates, or even on reasons for exhibiting caution. If you try to do too much too soon, you can get injured, whether you are wearing shoes or not. I don’t think barefoot running is for most people (because of the necessary investment to get back up to speed), but you should really ask around to see why running shoes have the obvious design flaws I note in my previous posts.

    And before lecturing me again on the advice of medical professionals, you should know that I teach at a major US medical school.

    -Dave

    • http://www.primermagazine.com Andrew

      David,

      In all of the above comments there has been a constant complaint that “we’re just making this stuff up” without any research. And yet, you’ve provided no external resources by way of accepted research or notable doctors to support your claims (except of course your two nameless friends.) By offering you those quotes, we’re providing to you where our opinions are coming from. I also think it’s rather amusing you accuse me of lecturing when that’s all you’ve been doing because you were offended by some word choice that doesn’t change the original point of the article. So until you’re the president of the American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine, which I’ve quoted as agreeing with some of our conclusions, your teaching career isn’t deterring me from disagreeing with you.

  • Robert

    David,

    A bit of broken glass through the foot is all the solid evidence most of us need.

    It’s interesting to note that virtually every person speaking in favor of barefoot includes something along the lines of “it isn’t for everyone” and “it takes awhile to get used to.” The AAPSM also refuses to endorse barefoot running and for much of its existence, reviewed and endorsed safe footwear.

    I’m sure there is a barefoot blog out there somewhere that caters to the subculture, but the vast, vast, vast majority of people who run wear shoes. This article is for them.

    It’s somewhat frustrating that every negative response focuses completely on one or two paragraphs about barefoot running, but completely ignores the fact that we endorse barefoot workouts when and where its safe. I guess we just differ on the pavement of a major city being safe.

    I think its also somewhat interesting that programs exist worldwide to give shoes to people who don’t have them, because shoes are protective. It seems to me this month or more adjustment period is just akin to skin toughening and damaging. Should all people interested in boxing or martial arts spend weeks punching a block of wood? I did, and it toughened my hands the way it was supposed to. But I don’t insult anyone, or take offense, when someone insists on wearing gloves to protect their hands.

    In researching barefoot running more and more, I’m not even close to changing my opinion that most people should be wearing shoes. I’ve read reviews from Vibram Five Finger users who, surprise surprise, stepped on something sharp or developed plantar fascitis. Vibram even now makes “rugged” versions of their footwear which is a version with a much thicker, more protective sole.

    I plan on revisiting this topic later after more research, but my basic findings indicate that if you want the benefits of barefoot running without the dangers, there are super flexible pairs of shoes that might just do the trick.

    We’re looking into it.

    Best,

  • David Blake

    My efforts in posting were only intended to put real world perspective on what appears to be inaccurate journalism about barefoot running. Piercing your foot is not going to happen. If you run on hard surfaces and adapt slowly plantar fascitis is not going to happen. What will happen is lots of nights of sore feet while you get adapted. And if you’d rather wear shoes, go ahead, but don’t paint barefoot runners as idiots (which, to be SPECIFIC, your columnist did).

    -Dave

  • Robert

    Dave,

    Seriously my friend. “Piercing your foot is not going to happen.” You would advise people willing to run barefoot to be unconcerned with stepping on sharp objects?

    As far as I’m concerned if you’re so blind to the obvious dangers of barefoot running, the rest of your opinion loses significant weight.

    R.

  • David Blake

    Robert, the result is correct, piercing your foot is not something that is going to happen. The lack of danger comes from the overabundance of lesser dangers, like 2-3 mm pebbles. Barefoot runners step on these all the time and they hurt! As a result, the barefoot runner keeps his eyes on the road, and tries to avoid stepping on anything that will hurt. As the object is avoiding anything bigger than 2 mm (or so), you will certainly avoid anything big and sharp enough to pierce your foot. Hope this clear things up.

    -Dave

  • http://TwinePineMall.com Doc Brown

    As this time periods most eminent Emmet scientist, I can safely say, David Blake, that just because some goes barefoot does not automatically mean they’re a more attentive person. Your implication is also that regular runners don’t watch where they’re going.

    In summation, your choice of footwear is actually irrelevant to the amount of attention paid – all runners watch where they’re going, but even observant people have lapses.

    The only fact of the matter would be that, if both runners are equal in all respects, the shod runner will experience less damage (in fact, potentially no damage) from debris, while the barefoot runner would suffer more (potentially much more).

    -Science.

  • http://www.fitnesswalkingshoe.com Richard

    The Skechers Shape-Ups are great, I have the new SRR Skechers Resistance Runner. You can only get the at Skechers stores I think.

  • Micah

    There was a post above stating that if you have foot pronation you shouldn’t run barefoot. That’s too bad people are saying that. I grew up running with shoes. I ran a few marathons and have run numerous other races. My feet have been pretty badly pronated for as long as I can remember. Since starting running BF about 4 months ago my pronation is almost completely gone…

    Something for you to think about Robert. I can guarantee all these BF runners used to run with shoes. Why did they take their shoes off? What have they experienced since then that has not encouraged them to put their shoes back on?
    Another thing to think about, all the people saying not to run barefoot have never been a barefoot runner. Never given their feet and body time to adapt and see what the results are.

    Now ask yourself. Who has more knowledge on the complete subject? Who has more experience on the complete subject? What did they chose?

    By all means keep running with shoes, write articles about how to chose the right shoes, but calling barefoot runners idiots just shows how little you know.

  • http://www.primermagazine.com Andrew

    Micah, Thanks for taking the time to comment. I think you’ll find if you go back and read Robert’s previous responses to comments, the point is: If you have a place where you’re able to run safely barefoot with no fear of debris or negative joint impact, by all means. Here in Los Angeles you’d have to get a tetanus shot every week, and there’s no grass to speak of. Like he mentioned above, people are getting wrapped up in a flourish, without reading his point.

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