Vanquish Depression Like the Man You Are

Vanquish Depression Like the Man You Are

Depression Feature

Everyone gets down, but that doesn’t mean you’re out.  With these helpful hints you can kick depression to the curb for a happier, healthier you.

By Virilitas

As men, we don’t always realize when our emotions are out of order. We may only know that we feel unmotivated and unenthusiastic or can’t seem to get out of bed in the morning.

Every guy feels depressed from time to time. Whether that depression is mild, brief, and linked to a particular negative event or severe, long-lasting, and general, it is always unpleasant and inconvenient. It gets in the way of work and relationships.

Since recognizing a problem is the first step in solving it, I recommend taking a brief depression self-test such as this one.

If you are considering suicide, then get professional help immediately; it is manly to get help when you need it. Otherwise, keep reading for tips that can help you with depression and “the blues.”

Take Care of Your Body

Eat regular, healthy meals to keep your body energized. You don’t drive your car without gasoline, so don’t drive your body without sufficient fuel, either!

Exercise at least several times per week. It boosts mood and self-esteem by increasing blood flow and triggering feel-good chemicals in the body. Even better, exercise with a friend.

Get enough sleep. If you are “depressed” but only lie down for four hours per night, you may just be physically tired.

Cut down on caffeine and alcohol.

Take Care of Your Mind

Take time for mental recreation. Don’t just think about work and your “To Do” list all day long. Give yourself a break. Distract yourself.

Journal. Take time to write down your thoughts, and then restructure/rewrite the negative ones to be more realistic. Depressed people habitually think about things in negative terms yet often consider their thoughts to be realistic. If you need help identifying the unreasonable aspects of your thoughts or restructuring thoughts to be balanced and positive, then borrow Feeling Good from your library.

Do Something

Depression can be brought on or made worse by inactivity, so go out and get something done. Meet a personal goal, volunteer, play a sport, ask friends out to eat, sing along to your favorite songs, organize your desk, comment on an interesting blog. Don’t just sit there alone, brooding about your troubles.

If you are already doing all of the things mentioned in this article (and I do mean ALL of them) but still feel depressed, then you may want to talk with a supportive family member, friend, mental health professional, or doctor. You’re a man, and you don’t have to be passive in the face of depression.

Read more by Virilitas on his blog that’s dedicated to recovering masculinity and arming it with gentility.

  • Pingback: Guest post on Depression… | Virilitas

  • Lorin

    Good tips there; staying (or becoming) physically active can be immensely beneficial whether you’re just down in the dumps or are someone who struggles with prolonged, recurring depressive episodes. (Believe me, I speak from experience…) I’ve never failed to be amazed at how much my mental well-being can be improved by a little physical effort.

    Perhaps the best advice offered here is to definitely seek professional help, if you even think you may need it. While a positive, self-reliant attitude is a great thing to have, sometimes, it takes more than just ‘manning up’ to fight off depression. Society is changing; there is no longer the stigma attached to seeking help for mental health issues that there once was, so, as the author says, be a man and get help if you need it. Great stuff here.

  • Will

    I’m sorry, I don’t want to argue, but back when I was depressed, none of those things ended my depression, and I’d hate for someone really suffering to rely on answers that won’t work for them either.

    What ended my depression was identifying what in my life I couldn’t accept, and accepting it. I don’t mean to make it sound easy. It took many years. It might have taken fewer if I’d known that was what I needed.

  • Lorin

    I think it’s a bit simiplistic to say that just because something hasn’t worked for one person it won’t work for another. One’s mental condition is obviously a very personal, individual experience, as is the efficacy of the steps mentioned above.

    All the latest research supports the recommendations in the above article. That’s not to say intense introspection is not valuable, but taking concrete steps like the ones mentioned above can indeed have a very beneficial effect for many, many people. If something doesn’t work, as the article suggests, move on and try something else.

  • http://virilitas.com Virilitas

    Thanks for the comments, gentlemen; it helps to learn about other people’s experiences in dealing with depression. ;)

  • http://www.thechemicalbomb.com sleejay

    I am glad I found this post, it’s exactly what I was looking for to help me get through a hard time positively. Thanks.

  • Pingback: The Art of Manliness Weekly Roundup: Man Cookbook Edition | HisCast

  • http://nlphilia.net mdebusk

    I just found this site, and it looks great.

    What worked for me in the past was learning something new. Not something similar to what I was already doing, but a radical departure from the typical, a real mental challenge. In my case, it was computer programming.

  • Serilus

    Depression often has a physiological basis that cannot be overcome by “positive thinking” or even psychotherapy alone. I don’t advocate drugs as an appropriate treatment in all cases, but if there is a physical problem in the brain, it needs to be address physically first.

    I suffered from depression related to a traumatic brain injury that I refused to believe was physical until I received treatment for it.

  • http://thebwildecolumn.blogspot.com/ B. Wilde

    Love that you are addressing it is as “manly” topic. It is so overlooked. Especially when you’re a man and don’t know how to address it and get into all those feeling things. If your someone who doesn’t typically talk about your feelings, the last thing you want to do when you’re feeling down is reach out and start up a conversation. Thanks for taking this head-on.

  • http://www.filmschoolrejects.com Doc Brown

    When no one believed in my flux capicator, I got down on myself. I got more physically active, which helped, and started writing things down like above. It helps to get it out. Of course, shortly thereafter I went back in time, gave my safe the solution to depression and lived an immensely happy life in 1885.

  • http://justinyourmind.com Justin

    I suffer from a tinge of anxiety which is what I’ve discovered to be just part of my chemical composition. For the longest time I was overly worried and nervous in large social situations and it got to the point where I had beaten myself up so much that I knew I needed to reach out for help. While I don’t condone just getting a prescription from the doctor, I do know that with my case I didn’t want to talk anymore about my problems because I couldn’t stop running through them in my head. I’m now on a medication that is minimal but has given me a lot of relief in my ability to get past a lot of the little stuff that I used to get overly nervous about.

    I think we live in a time where the pressure is ever-increasing to be perfect, to fit the mold of what we see and hear and when we can’t live up to that, it because really difficult to determine how to live.

    There’s a certain freedom in going against the grain but it does come with a certain price on your psyche.

  • http://www.23nlpeople.com NLP

    Depression can be very difficult for many people to break out of. The lack of motivation feeds back onto itself. Switch off that computer and go outside! Do something, DO anything, just DO something.

  • Pingback: The Art of Manliness Weekly Roundup: Man Cookbook Edition | The Art of Manliness

  • Pingback: A 2008 Primer Retrospective | Primer

  • Pingback: Closing Time: The Last Step Before Stepping Into Your First Home | Primer

  • Pingback: Guest Post on Depression » Virilitas

  • Pingback: Build Your Justice League: People You Should Have in Your Circle of Friends | Alpha Male Tribe

  • ladbrady

    I have NO friends. That contributed to my depression, which makes it impossible to find friends which makes me depressed which makes it impossible to function which makes me depressed which makes me lonely and depressed and my family wishes I was dead which is depressing which reinforces my loneliness which ……………..

  • ladbrady

    I want to CHANGE things. Where is that bottle of benadryl? No one will care.